Last edited by Bajin
Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

1 edition of Ecological characterization of Rocky Mountain montane and subalpine wetlands found in the catalog.

Ecological characterization of Rocky Mountain montane and subalpine wetlands

Ecological characterization of Rocky Mountain montane and subalpine wetlands

  • 206 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Dept. of the Interior in Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Rocky Mountains.
    • Subjects:
    • Wetland ecology -- Rocky Mountains.,
    • Mountain ecology -- Rocky Mountains.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby John T. Windell ... [et al.] ; project officer, Charles A. Segelquist.
      SeriesBiological report ;, 86-11 (Sept. 1986), Biological report (Washington, D.C.) ;, 86-11.
      ContributionsWindell, John T., Segelquist, Charles., United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Region VIII. Water Management Division., National Ecology Center (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQH104.5.R6 E28 1986
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxxi, 298 p. :
      Number of Pages298
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2345936M
      LC Control Number86603421

        Rocky Mountain National Park is one of the highest national parks in the nation, with elevations from 7, feet to 14, feet. Sixty mountain peaks o feet high result in world-renowned scenery. The Continental Divide runs north - south through the park, and marks a . The purpose of Rocky Mountain National Park (ROMO) is to preserve the high-elevation ecosystems and wilderness character of the southern Rocky Mountains within its borders and to provide the freest recreational use of and access to the park's scenic beauties, wildlife, .

      Cooper, D. J. Community structure and wetland classification of Rocky Mountain wetland ecosystems. Chapter 3. p. 66– In: An Ecological Characterization of Rocky Mountain Montane and Subalpine Wetlands. USDI Fish and Wildlife Serv. Biol. Rep. Google Scholar. Introduction: The LANDFIRE existing vegetation layers describe the following elements of existing vegetation for each LANDFIRE mapping zone: existing vegetation type, existing vegetation canopy cover, and existing vegetation height. Vegetation is mapped using predictive landscape models based on extensive field reference data, satellite imagery, biophysical gradient layers, and classification.

      The Rocky Mountains subalpine zone is the biotic zone immediately below tree line in the Rocky Mountains of North northern New Mexico, the subalpine zone occupies elevations approximately from 9, to 12, feet (2, to 3, m); while in northern Alberta, the subalpine zone extends from 1, to 2, metres (4, to 7, ft). Cooper, D. J. Additions to the peatland flora of the southern Rocky Mountains: habitat description and water chemistry. Madrono 38(2): Fertig, W. and G. Jones. Plant communities and rare plant species of the Swamp Lake Botanical Area, .


Share this book
You might also like
European Brewery Convention

European Brewery Convention

Managing staff reductions in corporations

Managing staff reductions in corporations

Characterization and photoaffinity labeling of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

Characterization and photoaffinity labeling of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

Paradox 4.0/4.5 for DOS

Paradox 4.0/4.5 for DOS

Fountain

Fountain

Arbitration law of Canada

Arbitration law of Canada

Doric temple

Doric temple

Decentralization and marketization

Decentralization and marketization

The pig farmers veterinary book

The pig farmers veterinary book

Joseph S. Oakley.

Joseph S. Oakley.

Culdcept.

Culdcept.

The great romantic

The great romantic

Crack growth

Crack growth

Roots for Revolt

Roots for Revolt

Ecological characterization of Rocky Mountain montane and subalpine wetlands Download PDF EPUB FB2

Ecological characterization of Rocky Mountain montane and subalpine wetlands. Washington, DC: Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Dept. of the Interior, [] (OCoLC) Ecological characterization of Rocky Mountain montane and subalpine wetlands.

Washington, DC: National Ecology Center, Division of Wildlife and Contaminant Research, Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Get this from a library.

An Ecological characterization of Rocky Mountain montane and subalpine wetlands. [John T Windell; National Ecology Center (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Division of Wildlife and Contaminant Research.; United States.

Environmental Protection Agency. Region VIII. Water Management Division.;]. Rocky Mountain Subalpine-Montane Fens are groundwater-fed, peat-accumulating wetlands with perennially saturated soils.

An Ecological characterization of Rocky Mountain montane and subalpine wetlands / By Charles. Segelquist, John T. Windell, U.S. Fish and Wildlife. of the Interior, Washington, DC.""This study was conducted in cooperation with Water Management Division Region VIII, Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, CO."Bibliography: p.

Mode of. Back to top Wet meadows in the Southern Rocky Mountains are herbaceous wetlands with mineral soils and a fluctuating water table. These wetlands are found throughout both the Rocky Mountain and Intermountain regions, occurring at elevations from the montane to the alpine (2,–3, m or 7,–13, ft).

Ecological processes in Rocky Mountain wetlands. Pages in J.T. Windell, B.E. Willard, D.J. Cooper, S.Q. Foster, C.F. Knud-Hansen, L.P.

Rink, and G.N. Kiladis, editors. An ecological. Ponds (P), Alpine-Montane Wet Meadows (Wm), and Subalpine-Montane Riparian Shrublands (S) are generally considered special riparian habitat zones of high importance for protection of water quality. Abstract Wetlands are common in montane and subalpine settings in the Rocky Mountains, Sierra Nevada, and other mountainous regions of the western U.S.

Because they are efficient filters, many contain anomalous concentrations of uranium and other metals. An Ecological Characterization of Rocky Mountain Montane and Subalpine Wetlands. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Biological Report 86(11). Washington, D.C. The book: examines the biogeographic and paleoenvironmental setting and historical climate that have shaped Rocky Mountain ecosystems traces the direct human influences on landscapes and ecosystems over the past years explores the cumulative effects of past, present, and projected future human activities on tundra, subalpine and montane.

Rocky Mountain Subalpine-Montane Mesic Meadow; they are most common as high-elevation wetlands in the colder and wetter mountains of the Beartooth-Absaroka range and in northwestern Montana. Pages in: J. Windell, et al.

An ecological characterization of Rocky Mountain montane and subalpine wetlands. USDI Fish & Wildlife. Rocky Mountains Subalpine-Montane Woodland. Rocky Mountain Lower Montane-Foothill Riparian Woodland and Shrubland systems occupy slightly higher elevations than Western Great Plains systems, ranging from 5, feet.

Pepin, D.M., N. Poff and J.S. Baron. Ecological Effects of Resource Development in Running Waters. In Rocky. Influence of water table levels on CO 2 emissions in a Colorado subalpine ecological characterization of Rocky Mountain montane and subalpine wetlands.

US Fisheries Wildlife Service Biological Rep Google Scholar. Woods, Woods, S.W., Hydrological affects of the Grand Ditch on streams and wetlands in Rocky Mountain. Rocky Mountain Montane Basin Marsh & Wet Meadow Washington Natural Heritage Program (WNHP) ecologists have completed a statewide classification of native wetland and riparian vegetation called the Ecological Classification of Native Wetland & Riparian Vegetation of Washington.

The objective was to provide a hierarchical classification to document wetland and riparian. Finally, although a species may be associated with a particular ecological system within its known geographic range, portions of that ecological system may occur outside of the species' known geographic range.

Literature Cited. Adams, R.A. Bats of the Rocky Mountain West; natural history, ecology, and conservation. Rocky Mountain Subalpine-Montane Fen Ecological System January 6, Ecological Integrity Assessment Prepared by: Joe Rocchio CECES Rocky Mountain Subalpine-Montane Fen DivisionHerbaceous Wetland evaporation and precipitation has a strong influence on the hydrology of wetlands throughout the region.

locations along the Rocky Mountain Front, in the Rocky Mountains and and intermountain valleys, in the small isolated central mountain ranges, and at higher elevations on the Beartooth Plateau in the southern portion of the state. Diagnostic Characteristics Seepage-fed slopes, montane to subalpine elevations, organic peat layer greater than 40 cm.

In addition, species richness of montane and subalpine riparian areas in the Southern Rocky Mountains was found to be as rich or richer than riparian ecosystems in the southwest, central, and northeast portions of the United States and was found to have higher species richness than most temperate North American forests (Baker ).

The montane ecosystem is the lowest in elevation at RMNP and encompasses mountain meadows, ponderosa, lodgepole, and Douglas-fir forests. Generally ranging from 5, – 9, feet this ecosystem is warmer and drier than the other ecosystems.

Cooper DJ () Community structure and classification of Rocky Mountain wetland ecosystems. In: Windell JT (ed) An ecological characterization of Rocky Mountain montane and subalpine wetlands. USDI Fish Wildl Serv Biol Rep, Washington, DC, pp 66– Google Scholar.The ecology of the Sierra Nevada, located in the U.S.

state of California, is diverse and complex: the plants and animals are a significant part of the scenic beauty of the mountain combination of climate, topography, moisture, and soils influences the distribution of ecological communities across an elevation gradient from to 14, feet ( to 4, m).An ecological characterization of Rocky Mountain montane and subalpine wetlands.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Biological Report Wildlife of Natural Palustrine Wetlands.